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An experiment in writing in public, one page at a time, by S. Graham, I. Milligan, & S. Weingart

Who is this volume for?

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 Previous Section: The Backstory of this Volume

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 Our ideal reader is an advanced undergraduate looking for guidance as they encounter big data for the first time. For use in undergraduate digital history classes, we would suggest instructors use this present text in conjunction with The Programming Historian at programminghistorian.org and Daniel Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig’s Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web.[1] Students and instructors should also keep a keen eye on digitalhumanitiesnow.org.  We imagine this volume as a handbook also for the graduate student confronted by a vast corpus of material, for the researcher encountering these methods for the first time, and for the interested individual who has stumbled across a trove of genealogical data, or digitized newspapers, or the local historical society who are trying to see the value in digitizing their holdings in the first place. We have kept the jargon to a minimum, and at all times we have tried not to make assumptions about levels of digital proficiency that are unwarranted. We do assume that if you are holding this volume, you are interested in using your computer’s power for more than simply consuming media online or typing a word document, that you wish to actively create and interrogate digital data.

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 And, finally, we assume that you’re willing to get your hands dirty.

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 There will be times however where perhaps there is something missing, something not quite as clear as it could be. Please do leave us a comment on the book’s website, and we will try to provide clarification. Also, you should be aware of sites like:

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 Digital Humanities Questions and Answers: http://digitalhumanities.org/answers/

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 Stack Overflow: http://stackoverflow.com/

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 Digital Humanities Questions and Answers and Stack Overflow are websites designed to help people who need information connect with those who have it handy! If you have a question, the first step should be to simply plug it into your search engine of choice. If the answer does not appear, create an account on either of these two websites and ask away. Try to be as specific as possible: make sure to mention what program you’re using, what operating system, and provide an example of what you have been doing to answer the question.

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 The best part is that when you ask your question, you’re also helping other people who might have the question in the future! There are some other sites to keep your eyes open for as well:

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 Digital Humanities Now: http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 The Journal of Digital Humanities: http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 These are two of the leading online publications for what’s going on right now in the digital humanities, circa 2014. The former curates and collects the blogs of active researchers and contributors, of which selected pieces are then put into the more formal Journal of Digital Humanities. They are well worth bookmarking to see how the field evolves!

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0 And follow the twitter accounts of figures in the field. Daniel Cohen maintains a good list at https://twitter.com/dancohen/digitalhumanities

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 Shawn is on twitter https://twitter.com/electricarchaeo

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 Ian is on twitter at https://twitter.com/ianmilligan1

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 Scott is on twitter at https://twitter.com/scott_bot

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 Come say hi!

17 Leave a comment on paragraph 17 0 Next Section: Who are we and how did we get into Digital History?


18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 [1] Daniel J. Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig, Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), http://chnm.gmu.edu/digitalhistory/.

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